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At last! Turbine fully tested and ready to roll.

October 1st, 2010
Our new 6 blade design.

Our new 6 blade design.

We are happy to announce that after many delays, we have completed our testing and are ready to launch our 2.5kw domestic wind turbine.
A lot of has happened since we first went public with our Wind Turbine project. There are many new entrants offering wind turbines, and as renewable energy enthusiasts we welcome the fact that Irish companies are seeing openings for domestic wind turbines. We are confident that after extensive testing we have a robust Domestic Wind Turbine suitable for most one-off rural houses that have a suitable site.
We are also very conscious of the current economic difficulties facing Ireland today, so we kept our Wind Turbine as affordable as possible.
On industrial, and many domestic wind turbines, the optimum number of blades is considered to be three. This is because of a number of factors including the cost of producing blades. Because our blades are injection moulded, the cost of the blade is less significant than for GRP blades that are more labour intensive. We are also able to experiment with different blade pitches to establish the optimum number of blades and pitch for our system.

In low wind speeds, turbines do not spin fast enough to capture all the wind passing between their blades, but you can increase the percentage captured by increasing the number of blades.

Extensive work in this area has been conducted at Clarkson University where studies at Potsdam Airport, NY have shown that increasing blade number increases power output, particularly at lower wind speeds.

However, most small wind turbines continue to utilize 3 blades, and according to researchers at Clarkson, it is thought that this is because the smaller turbines are still based on the economic philosophy carried down from the larger utility scale turbines

Clarkson also experimented with modifying other turbines, and in general it is believed that a higher number of blades can significantly improve performance at low wind speeds, and a lower cut in wind speed (the wind speed at which the turbine starts to produce usable power).

We have been experimenting with six blades on our own machine, and have found that by being able to reduce the operating speed, we have a quiet turbine, and greatly increased output. We’ve been so pleased with this performance that we have decided to use this 6-blade design on our wind turbines particularly for the improvements of output at lower wind speeds, which happen for a much higher percentage of the time.

To download our latest newsletter click here.

Regards

Turbotricity Team….

2 Responses to “At last! Turbine fully tested and ready to roll.”

  1. Martin says:

    You mention that your design is now using 6 blades instead of 3.
    One question I have, no doubt naive, is how come modern windmills dont have a similar blade/wing design as a childs toy windmill (like the one thats used at the beach) or the type that was used as a water pump on farmsteads in the US Western days? You mention that your design is now using 6 blades instead of 3.
    One question I have, no doubt naive, is how come modern windmills dont have a similar blade/wing design as a childs toy windmill (like the one thats used at the beach) or the type that was used as a water pump on farmsteads in the US Western days?
    eg: http://www.windmills.net

    These have mutiple blades that would seem to fill up more area of the wind catchment. I didnt look up why but no doubt science and wind tunnel/computer modelling has determined that ‘less is more’. Maybe there is some research on the topic that you have found or can point me to?

    Best Wishes for the Year,

    Martin

  2. Quentin says:

    Hi Martin,

    Most wind turbines have three blades with a fairly broad blade to provide structural integrity. A single blade would only catch all of the wind going through it if it was rotating at a very high speed in relation to the wind going through it. The optimum turbine would have an infinite number of infinitely narrow blades.

    The turbines you see used for pumping water etc., are usually required to rotate at a fairly constant speed, regardless of the winds speed. You don’t need more water on a windy day. Above a certain RPM, these turbines self-stall as one blade causes turbulence on the next one.

    Wind turbine blades are generally hand laid up and are expensive to produce. On larger wind turbines, if you had two blades for example, the wind speed is higher for the blade that is reaching upwards (at 12 o’clock) than for blade at 6 o’clock. The turbine shaft will constantly be twisting this way and that. For that reason, they have three blades as the blades at 4 o’clock and 8 o’clock more or less balance the opposite load on the uppermost blade.

    Smaller turbines have three blades mostly for economical reasons, but once they get up to their working speed, they do capture all the wind running between the blades. At lower wind speeds, and correspondingly lower RPM, they tend to lose some of the wind.

    We found that six blades work very well at lower rotational speeds, and this reduces noise at high wind speeds, and increases output at low wind speeds. Our blades are injection moulded, so once the mould is paid for, the price per blade is quite low. So it makes sense for us, but not for everyone…

    There is a paper here which provides more info on all this.

    Best wishes, Quentin.

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Turbotricity Ltd.

Moylagh, Oldcastle, Co. Meath, Ireland

info@turbotricity.com

Phone within Ireland Lo-Call 076 6152052

From overseas call +353 57 860 0054

  • Great return on investment
  • Perfect height for reduced turbulence
  • No planning headaches
  • Reduce your energy cost
  • Affordable turbine
Delighted with my Turbotricity turbine. It works away effortlessly and quietly giving me plenty of clean free power Brendan Murphy
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